Rick Perry and the “Pro-Sharia Curriculum:” Pamela Geller is Wrong

By David Stein

(My absolute final word on the subject — even if Pam Geller calls me “asshat” again – HERE)

In an article from last week, I thoroughly addressed, and (in my humble opinion) fatally wounded the claim promoted by Pamela Geller that Rick Perry forced Texas public schools to use a pro-Sharia curriculum.

In my post, I printed lengthy excerpts from the school lesson plan on Islam that resulted from Governor Perry’s association with the Ismaili Muslim Aga Khan Foundation. Far from being “pro-Sharia,” the lesson plan, written by retired history teacher (and self-described Christian Zionist) Ron Wiltse, was pro-Israel, pro-West, anti-Sharia, and critical of Islam.

There are so many legitimate topics of discussion regarding the pros and cons of each candidate in the race for the Republican nomination, I honestly hoped that, at the very least, we could put the “Rick Perry pro-Sharia curriculum” myth aside.

Not so. Late last week, Pamela Geller responded with a post boldly titled “Perry/Aga Khan Curriculum: ‘shocking example of Islamic propaganda forced upon unsuspecting students attending Texas public schools.’” The post opened with a thinly veiled attack on me and this site:

“Have you seen supposed ‘counter jihad’ sites giving the Perry/Aga Khan propaganda curriculum an A+? Huh? Did they even bother to read that garbage? it is strangley (sic) disquieting to see these ‘fighters’ fight for the Islamic propaganda of unabashed Islamic supremacists. If they are down with this, what exactly is it that they are they fighting? Do they know how stupid they look?”

Well, I’ll be the first one to admit that I look pretty damn stupid most of the time, but that’s on account of my disdain for shaving and my love of Hawaiian shirts. But on this blog, at least, I try fairly hard not to look stupid.

Geller approvingly posts an email sent to her from one of her regular readers, “Dave” (no relation). “Dave” has this to say about the Perry/Khan curriculum:

Thank you for calling attention to Perry’s cozy relationship with the Aga Khan.  I have personally reviewed the curriculum developed as a joint project between Gov. Perry and “his highness,” and discovered that it is indeed a shocking example of Islamic propaganda forced upon unsuspecting students attending Texas public schools.  It’s appalling.  To put it in a nutshell, the Islamic perspective of history has been inserted without critique into Texas classrooms….I’m willing to grant Gov. Perry the benefit of the doubt and believe that his actions are the product of naiveté and ignorance, rather than actual hostility to the West.  However, his ignorance is inexcusable, and the damage he has done is immense.  If Barack Obama had imposed such a curriculum on schools we’d be calling for his impeachment.  Therefore it is unconscionable to look the other way when it comes to Perry.  In my opinion, not only should Perry not be President, he should be impeached from the Texas governorship. Thanks again; you were right!

To prove his point, “Dave” quotes paragraph after paragraph of text from the “curriculum.” For anyone who read my original article, and who then read this Atlas Shrugs piece, there must have been a certain amount of confusion. What “Dave” posted was completely different from the lesson plan I posted and linked to in my original article.

And there is a very simple reason for that…“Dave” was not quoting from the school curriculum.

“Dave” was quoting from the abstracts (summaries) of the sessions that the teachers who volunteer for the Muslim Histories and Culture Project (MHCP) attend. On the MHCP site, one can read abstracts of each seminar (also referred to as “sessions”).

There are no authors credited with writing the abstracts. There is no way to know how accurately they represent what the sessions are actually like, except to do what I did – interview a teacher who completed the training (the aforementioned Ron Wiltse). Mr. Wiltse told me, in no uncertain terms, that the training involved no pro-Islam proselytizing.

And, in the end, the proof is what resulted from the training – what actually made its way into the classroom. I can trust a 60-something-year-old world history teacher with a Master’s Degree to read books from various points of view and reach his own conclusions. My concern, and I think I share this with most of my readers, is what our children are exposed to in the classroom.

And that’s what the lesson plan I quoted from in my original article is. Those are the words that the students see. What Atlas Shrugs posted are abstracts from seminars that are not intended for students, and not attended by students.

When Pamela Geller claims that the excerpts she posted are “forced upon unsuspecting students attending Texas public schools,” she is, at best, mistaken. At worst, it’s a blatant falsehood.

While Ms. Geller was (knowingly or not) misrepresenting the seminar abstracts as the school curriculum, other “Rick Perry Sharia curriculum” die-hards (especially those who left comments on my story and clogged by inbox with angry emails) were taking a different tactic. After picking apart the lesson plan, and finding nothing in it that even remotely qualifies as pro-Sharia, they decided to complain instead that the lesson was poorly written and not exhaustive enough!

I agree that the lesson plan isn’t exhaustive. But the original charge wasn’t that the Perry/Khan curriculum is less-than-exhaustive or peppered with typos. The original claim was that the curriculum is pro-Sharia. That’s what Ms. Geller charged.

The lesson plan is not pro-Sharia. Period. Pamela Geller is wrong.

Ms. Geller wasn’t the only one reacting to my article. The eminent Robert Spencer took to the comments section of his own site to reply to a reader who posted some excerpts from my piece (Spencer’s comment is the 6th one down). Spencer’s reply refers to a quote of his I used, in which he affirmed that the Ismaili Muslims are nonviolent and not pro-jihad:

When I did that symposium with (Dr. Timothy) Furnish, I agreed that the Ismailis taught nonviolence. That was all. Now it has come to light, thanks to Pamela Geller, that the Aga Khan owns an al-Qaeda bank and has been funding Syria, a state sponsor of terrorism. That doesn’t mean that he doesn’t teach nonviolence — my words in that symposium simply aren’t dealing with the facts I present in this present post, and cannot be used to refute them or even to show a contradiction.

Citizen K, I fail to see how Pamela Geller discredited herself in any way. The sources I use above are ones she uncovered.

Cordially,

Robert Spencer

Now, technically, Mr. Spencer’s reply gets Perry off the hook entirely for his past association with the Aga Khan. After all, if Robert Spencer – whose entire raison d’être is investigating and tracking Islamists –  didn’t know about these “new facts” until last week, well…certainly Rick Perry can be excused for not knowing them as well.

All the same, these “new facts” deserve to be examined. Here are the new allegations “uncovered” by Pamela Geller:

1. The Aga Khan Foundation and Habib Bank

Geller:

The Ismailis are peaceful, yes, and the Aga Khan Foundation is an established Islamic charity. But the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development is also part-owner of the Pakistan-based Bank al-Habib, which Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl’s widow Mariane sued in 2007 for damages relating to its funding of al-Qaida and involvement in the murder of her husband by Islamic jihad terrorists. She dropped the suit later that year without explanation, except to note that the Habib Bank had never answered her charges.

Indeed, in 2007, Daniel Pearl’s widow sued Habib Bank (along with several other parties), charging that the bank had failed to freeze the account of the Pakistan-based al-Akhtar Trust, which, in the early 2000s, had been used to fund terrorist activities. In a press release, the bank vigorously denied the charges, claiming it froze the account several years before the murder of Mr. Pearl, after the Pakistani government issued notices to all banks to freeze the trust.

However, what would have been helpful is if Ms. Geller had informed her readers that the Aga Khan Foundation was not part-owner of Habib Bank until two years after the murder of Daniel Pearl. The controversy over whether or not the al-Akhtar Trust was frozen after 9/11 is a problem the Aga Khan Foundation inherited when it purchased a majority share in the bank in 2004. The bank, Pakistan’s oldest (with branches in New York, California, Hong Kong, the Netherlands, Belgium, Canada, and Australia), had been nationalized in 1974. In a “fire sale”-type move, the Pakistani government put 51% of the bank up for sale in 2004, to help pay off its overseas debt and reduce its budget deficit. Sensing a good business opportunity, the Khan Foundation put in the highest bid, beating the second highest bidder, the State of Qatar.

The transfer of management control to the Khan Foundation occurred in February 2004, exactly two years after Pearl’s murder.

Whether or not the bank froze the Akhtar Trust after 9/11, the Khan Foundation was not involved at the time. In 2006, under Khan Foundation control, the bank submitted a formal plan to the U.S. Federal Reserve Board to assure full compliance with anti-money laundering laws.

Considering the fact that the government of Pakistan is about as loyal and trustworthy an ally as a pet scorpion, the Western-friendly Khan Foundation is probably a preferable alternative when it comes to who controls Pakistan’s largest commercial bank.

2. The Aga Khan Foundation and Syria

Geller:

And then on August 26, 2008, the Aga Khan Development Network made a proud announcement: “The Syrian Government and the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) yesterday signed three landmark agreements designed to strengthen collaboration in the areas of microfinance, healthcare, and cultural tourism.” Syria’s Prime Minister, Mohamed Naji Al-Otri, and the Aga Khan signed the agreements. The agreements involved recognition of the First Microfinance Institution (FMFI), part of the Aga Khan Agency for Microfinance, “as the first microfinance institution to operate in the country.” Between 2003 and 2008, it spent $40 million to develop business in Syria.

Investigative reporter Mark Mitchell observes that “the Aga Khan Foundation’s membership and supporters also include top military officers in Syria, such as General Moustapha Sharba, who had a hand in the early stages of the covert nuclear weapons program that Syria was developing with help from North Korea (and probably Iran).”

I’ll take the second paragraph first. The “General Moustapha Sharba” accusation is found only on the “everything but the kitchen sink” conspiracy-theory site of Mark Mitchell…which wouldn’t be a problem if he sourced it. But he doesn’t. And Mitchell himself doesn’t even seem convinced of his own claim, writing on other pages of his site that “it is believed” that Sharba had a hand in Syria’s covert efforts. “It is believed?” By who? By Mark Mitchell? Sorry – I need a bit more than that (actually, I need a whole lot more than that).

Regarding the first paragraph, the Aga Khan visited Syria in 2008 as part of his Jubilee celebration:

The Aga Khan leads a community of 15 million Ismaili Muslims living in some 25 countries around the world and is a direct descendant of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him and his family). In the Ismaili tradition, the Imam’s Jubilee celebrations offer occasions to launch new social, cultural and economic development projects. In keeping with the ethics of the faith, these projects aspire to improve the quality of life for the most vulnerable in society. During the Jubilee year, the Aga Khan will travel to a number of countries to meet with members of the Ismaili community, visit projects of the AKDN and announce the creation of new development institutions and projects and the significant expansion of existing ones.

The Aga Khan Foundation is philanthropic and nonviolent. As part of its mission, it launches and maintains projects that encourage social, cultural, and economic development in the countries in which Ismaili Muslims live (there are over 200,000 Ismailis in Syria). In some cases, this means working with repressive governments. I will point out that this is not an uncommon practice by philanthropic organizations that represent ethnic or religious minorities that live under repressive regimes. The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), for example, worked with the government of brutal dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, pumping money into Romania in order to create social welfare institutions to benefit the Jewish community in that country. The JDC also partnered with the tyrannical Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe to provide medical training and care, and with Fidel Castro’s government to provide non-sectarian medical care in Cuba.

To assuage the anger of the all-caps comment crowd, I want to clearly point out that I am not comparing Jews to Ismailis. The Ismailis are often persecuted, yes, but they have never had to endure the wholesale oppression and mass-slaughter that has been inflicted on the Jews, from pogroms, forced conversions, and expulsions, to the Holocaust, to the wars of extermination against Israel, to the daily threat of Muslim terror. I am not comparing the plight of Jews to that of Ismailis; I’m merely pointing out that, for any organization tasked with protecting the interests of persecuted minority groups, having to deal with unsavory governments is a simple fact of life.

Needless to say, if Ms. Geller (or anyone else) can show that as much as one dollar of the Khan Foundation money that was spent in Syria went to terrorism-related activities, that would be an important story, and I would be the first to repost it.

3. Governor Perry and Grover Norquist

Geller:

Yes, all Perry did was give a speech in partnership with Grover Norquist, and promote it on his website. Norquist heads up Americans for Tax Reform, and Perry’s tax-cutting message is redolent of Norquist’s influence. But Norquist also has deep and extensive ties to Islamic supremacists and jihadists, as I showed in the first commentary. That raises legitimate questions about whether or not Perry knows about, or cares about, or even endorses, that activity by Norquist. I certainly would refuse to speak at the same event in partnership with Grover Norquist – let alone promote it on my website. Shouldn’t Rick Perry have, too?

I’m sorry, but this is just silly. Norquist has been a GOP insider since the days of Reagan. He defines “insider.” Read this article to understand the influence he wields with the current Republican congressional leadership, and with presidential candidates like Romney and Bachmann. As an example of just how ubiquitous Norquist is, he sits on the board of the American Conservative Union (along with potential presidential candidate Ambassador John Bolton) and the advisory council of the recently CPAC-expelled GOProud (along with Ann Coulter and Andrew Breitbart).

Earlier this year, Norquist spoke at the Faith and Freedom Coalition Conference, along with Michele Bachmann, Allen West, Thad McCotter, Tim Pawlenty, Mitt Romney, Marco Rubio, Herman Cain, Paul Ryan, and Newt Gingrich.

Bachmann, West, Rubio, McCotter, and Ryan are all proud signatories to Norquist’s Taxpayer Protection Pledge, with their names proudly displayed – with permission – on his website.

Concerns about Norquist’s ties with members of the Muslim Brotherhood are absolutely legitimate. Such concerns were laid out eloquently by David Horowitz, a man of great integrity who had the guts to call Norquist out at his own CPAC.

But what is not legitimate is to single Perry out for having an association with Norquist on anti-tax issues, when almost every other GOP presidential contender has done the same. That’s just asinine.

In his CPAC speech, Horowitz credited Frank Gaffney of the Center for Security Policy (CSP) as being the first person to bring Norquist’s unsavory Muslim Brotherhood associations to the attention of the other CPAC board members. I seriously doubt that most conservatives would accuse Gaffney or the CSP of being “dhimmis.” Yet CSP spokesman Dave Reaboi offered a heartfelt defense of Rick Perry, in an email to Commentary. I have a vacation to get back to, so I think I’ll let Mr. Reaboi have the last word:

The Ismailis are a persecuted Shia minority in Saudi Arabia; indeed, Perry’s meeting with Khan could not have won him many friends there. Rather than reaching out – as both presidents Bush and Obama mistakenly did – to problematic organizations associated with the Muslim Brotherhood’s expressly political agenda, Perry’s choice to engage with a more ‘progressive’ group is a good sign.

—-

No, this is not Texas under Rick Perry, regardless of what some people would like GOP voters to think.

Comments
42 Responses to “Rick Perry and the “Pro-Sharia Curriculum:” Pamela Geller is Wrong”
  1. gullah says:

    My goodness, you Perry supporters are twisting yourselves into pretzels aren’t you? Perry is naive about Islam. Just as dangerous as doing it on purpose.
    This sect may not believe in violent jihad, but don’t they believe in shariah? Don’t they read the same hate filled koran? Don’t they curse us everytime they pray? The opening prayer in the Koran is a curse on all nonmuslims.

    Why aren’t teaching our Judeo-Christian heritage instead of Islam? It is my understanding that this Texas curriculum is not being honest about child marriages and the jihad. I still think it is white washing Islam.

    Perry is also bad on immigration. Come on, this guy is not who we need. We must vet our candidates.

    Pray John Bolton jumps into the race.

    By the way, I think it is WORSE that this guy bought into that back AFTER Pearle was murdered.

    • z says:

      Gullah maybe this will give you a better understanding on how Ismailis differ from other Muslims. I feel like I would be a credible source as I am a Texan born Ismaili. Ismaili’s belive that the Aga Khan is a living talking Quran. Yes, we do belive the Quran as a holy book but alot of things in there are out dated. Such as the talk of killing the infiedels. At the time there were wars going on similar to the Holy Crusades for Christians. Killing the infidels is not relevent now because we live in a diffrent time in where people learn to love, respect, and appreciate diffrent races, cultures and religions. Ismaili’s are modern muslims that adapt with the time, thats why we always have a present living Imam. The Ismaili Imam interpruts the Quran in the present living time that we live in. For instance in the Quran it allows men to have multiple wives. No Ismaili’s that I know have multiple wives. And I know alot of Ismailis. My parents are both Ismaili’s who were born in Pakistan and my Dad treats my Mom as an equal. Ismaili’s are taught to love one another and to preach tolerance. We are taught that even though some people might not understand us we should try to explain to them the truth and if they still don’t belive us than its fine and that we should not be angry. If you have any questions I can try to answer them to the best of my ability. If you don’t belive anything I said and still hate Muslims and Ismailis thats fine too. I just appreciate you taking your time to read what I had to say. Hopefully somebody will belive me and mabey they will tell someone else and so forth and hopefully people will learn to trust Ismailis and other Muslims. I know I have a lot of misspelling. Please forgive me I wanted to submit this fast too see if you respond.

      • TruthWFree says:

        Z Says,
        Z, I am a Christian. I believe and try to follow every word that was written about what Jesus Christ said and taught in the Gospels. I fall short on some. I understand from my readings (including the Quran in its entirety), that Muslims are to believe it is the word of Allah. I also understand that it is as applicable now as it was in Muhammad’s day. Jesus Christ’s teachings in the Gospels are for all times, not just in those times when he walked the earth.
        You are saying “not so” on the Quran. How do you determine which parts are for all times and which parts are for the 7th century? Are you practicing taqiyya on us? The Muslims that kill infidels do not believe as you say. They believe as I say.
        Your Quran says that Jesus Christ was not the son of Allah and that he did not die on the cross. Is this for those times or for all times? As a Christian, I believe these statements in the Quran are lies. Taqiyya is lying to further Islam. Jesus Christ, in the Gospels said “Satan is the father of lies”. Allah is…you know who I think he is.
        I invite you to come to the Light of Jesus Christ if you are sincere. He said He was one with the Father and you have seen Me, you have seen the Father, and no one comes to the Father except through Me. The God of Christians (and Jews) is a loving God, rich in compassion. Allah is a god of hate. The Quran is full of hate. Allah is not the same person as the God of Abraham and the Father of Jesus. The teachings are diametrically opposed. I invite you to read the Gospels and get to know Jesus Christ. Jesus commanded us Christians to preach the Gospel to all nations. Come to the love that is Jesus Christ.

    • Elljay - NJ says:

      I really like Bolton as well but he lacks funding and a team to deliver him to the top.

    • ertdfg says:

      “Why aren’t teaching our Judeo-Christian heritage instead of Islam?”

      Why aren’t teaching you grammar and sentence structure?

      Seriously, but LOOK at the actual curriculum. You know who it favors? (as in, says they’re doing better)? Western Civilization and Israel. Teaching Middle East history and religion; while also showing that Western Civilization has made advances that put them at a disadvantage globally; and pointing out that they have a “violence” issue with people they don’t understand (anyone not them)… this offends you?

      “The conflict continues because the West, and the United States specifically, support Israel (an outpost of Western Civilization surrounded by Islamic Civilization), which Muslims generally dislike or hate.

      Islamic enmity toward Israel is complicated, but hatred of Jews and Israel can be traced at least to the success of Nazi anti-Jewish propaganda starting in 1933.”

      Look at that love of Islam; they’re tying their hatred of Israel and Jews to the NAZI’s… which clearly offends you because you want your side tied directly to the Nazi’s and their killing of millions of Jews… or something.

      Try reading, I realize it’s complicated; use both of your pointer-fingers if you have to.

      “By the way, I think it is WORSE that this guy bought into that back AFTER Pearle was murdered.”

      the word you wanted was “bank” I think… it’s hard to tell what you even think you mean. And how dare he take the largest bank in Pakistan and have it start working with the US to lock down terrorist funds. You’re right, that is offensive, it’d be much better to let terrorist funnel funding freely through the largest bank in Pakistan with no restrictions… if you’re for funding terrorists.

      Why do you support funding terrorists again? Is funding terrorists a good thing in your mind; or wouldn’t buying a bank that didn’t follow the rules of freezing terrorist funding and making them follow those rules be preferable?

      You’re on the side that doesn’t want it pointed out that Western Civilization is technologically and morally superior to Islamic nations… you’re on the side that doesn’t want the Islamic hatred of Jews mentioned, and you’re on the side that doesn’t want the freezing of accounts used to fund terrorism… right?

      Can you clarify which side you THINK you are on? Because I’m thinking you might not be working for the goals you thought you were working toward.

      • Ertdfg...you're an idiot says:

        Ertdfg… you seem to be outraged that someone would dare suggest that Judeo Christian principles, history and heritage should be taught in public schools instead of some backward sixth century cult of murder, lies and thefts.

        You pour out your anger on Gullah for suggesting such heresy by attacking her for making a couple of spelling mistakes which you mistakenly believe gives you an opportunity to show the world how “intelligent” you are and how “stupid” the Judeo Christian supporting Jesus freak is. Please highlight in your mind the words MISTAKENLY BELIEVE, because that is exactly what it was, a mistake on your part. Any curriculum in American schools which depicts Islam as anything other than the Satan worshiping cult of death that it is should NEVER be allowed to happen. And if you are not a supporter of Americas Judeo Christian heritage and proud of it, then please, by any and all means necessary, take your own stupid ass out of America and go live in a true Islamic society for a while. See how long it takes you to learn how superior and more desirable Christianity is over Islam.

        • Ertdfg...you're an idiot says:

          Ertdfg said… “Teaching Middle East history and religion; while also showing that Western Civilization has made advances that put them at a disadvantage globally; and pointing out that they have a “violence” issue with people they don’t understand (anyone not them)… this offends you?”

          IF you are correct and those lies and propaganda truly ARE part of the curriculum HELL YES THAT OFFENDS ME. The advances made by Western Civilization has not been the cause of Islamic countries being disadvantaged. Their disadvantage was solely caused by their own sixth century mentality which they are forced to believe because, after all, it is in their “Holy Book”, the Qu’ran, which they claim is the “word of god”. You said “…they have a “violence” issue with people they don’t understand….”. Like I said, lies and propaganda do offend me. Muslims have a “violence issue” with anyone who does not convert to their ideology willingly, because they are commanded to by their “prophet”

          You also said… “The conflict continues because the West, and the United States specifically, support Israel (an outpost of Western Civilization surrounded by Islamic Civilization), which Muslims generally dislike or hate.”

          As on every other “point” that you tried to make you are completely wrong on this also. The conflict continues because the Islamic “holy book”, the Qu’ran, demands that their be no peace until every one bows down to Allah and worships him and Muhammad as his prophet. The conflict continues because western civilization has made those backward satan worshipers filthy rich with petro dollars and now they can AFFORD to carry out their gods demand that Islam be the ONLY religion left on earth.

          You also said… “Islamic enmity toward Israel is complicated, but hatred of Jews and Israel can be traced at least to the success of Nazi anti-Jewish propaganda starting in 1933.” WHAT!!! Why do you pretend to know ANYTHING about Islam when it is painfully obvious that you know absolutely nothing? You should take your own advice that you gave to Gullah… and I quote… “Try reading, I realize it’s complicated; use both of your pointer-fingers if you have to.” Islamic enmity toward Israel dates back to the sixth century. It began with Muhammad himself (Do you know who Muhammad was?). It is codified in the Qu’ran in dozens, if not hundreds, of hatefilled verses concerning the Jews (umm… Israel, in case you’re not sure).

          And on a final note… you have no idea what Aga Khan is doing with the bank in Pakistan, so stop pretending that you do.

    • TruthWFree says:

      John Bolton?
      What would you think about Allen West…yes, I know he’s not running but he is a leader, speaks his mind, no PC BS, knows Islamic history, and most of all “Loves His Country”, defends the Constitution, and honors the vision of the Founding Fathers.
      I’d support him over all other Republicans if he ran.
      I’ve never seen a bad Allen West speech.

  2. Art says:

    Dude, learn to spell. You come across like a right-wing Archie Bunker stereotype. And damn it, READ before you comment. The Ismaili Muslims do indeed worship differently than other Muslims. That is why they are persecuted in Muslim lands. And the Texas curriculum does NOT whitewash Islam. It refers to it as “backwards,” “hateful,” “hostile,” “pro-Nazi,” “anti-progress,” and “pro-terrorism.” What the hell more do you want? You don’t like Perry? FINE. But don’t use lies to make your case.

  3. gullah says:

    Art, do they worship from the same Koran or not? Most of the Koran is violent. Do they believe in child marriage or not? I know muslims kill muslims everyday for being a different sect. Sunni’s kill Shites and vice versa.
    By the way, what did I misspell?

    • CL says:

      Oh please-the same can be said of the Bible-and how people twist it to suit their own needs or beliefs. I had a Christian woman tell me that the Bible admonishes people not to marry outside their race. I happen to be in an interracial marriage. The Bible does NOT teach that-it teaches Christians should not marry outside of our faith. But she is a racist so she twists scripture to support her attitude. One can also argue the New Testament teaches that slavery was acceptable as Paul said slaves should pray for their masters and obey them ( be good little slaves) for the glory of God…and that slave masters might see what good little Christians the slaves were and give honor to God. People can twist scripture in any holy book to suit their agenda.

      • gullah says:

        My dear, nowhere in the Bible does it say to kill in Christ’s name. The Koran tells them they are to wage jihad until Islam rules the earth. This garbage is taught in mosques throughout the country.
        Islam is a hate filled political system. It has no business on our soil.
        Multiple wives and killing one’s children is divinely sanctioned in Islam. So is slavery. I am well aware that there was slavery in the Bible, but Jesus did not condone it. Mohammad did. Muslims are taught that Mohammed was the perfect man!!

        Muslims are taught that Islam is supposed to rule the world. I see Perry supporters are ignorant on Islamic doctrine.

        • B says:

          Did, ah….you actually ever read the Quran? Or is this just the greatest hits from Fox News discussions on the topic?

          • TruthWFree says:

            I have read the Quran. Gullah knows what he is talking about. The Quran, 5-51, also says not to make friends with Christians and Jews. The Quran to a Muslim is supposed to be the word of allah to Muhammad. If Khan is truly a friends of Perry, he is rejecting allah’s word (I think not). It is alright for a Muslim to lie to an infidel to further Islam (taqiyya). I have never heard of cafeteria Muslims and I doubt this one is one, just another way of making Islam supreme in the world. I would not care how he preaches his religion if there were no kill the infidel verses in the Quran…and there are many.

        • TruthWFree says:

          I agree with you sir. Islam and Christianity cannot both be true because Islam contradicts Christ’s divinity and death on the cross, not to mention the teachings are diametrically opposed. Islam is kill the infidel and Christ taught love and forgiveness.

  4. vangrungy says:

    you are really, really trying to like something that’s associated with islam..

    I’m already picking apart the baha’i.. what? you thought they were just some poor persecuted iranians?

    yeah, ok bud.. keep going for the win..

    Pride goes before destruction, a haughty spirit before a fall.

  5. Bob says:

    I told Pam last week not to go off of her meds!

  6. Dave Stein at CounterContempt purports to refute the information Pamela Geller has provided about Rick Perry’s questionable associations. It would be reassuring if he had actually proven Perry to be clear of suspicion in these areas, but unfortunately that is not the case.

    1. The curriculum.

    Stein contends that the Atlas Shrugs reader who provided information about the Texas curriculum about Islam that the Aga Khan Foundation developed “was quoting from the abstracts (summaries) of the sessions that the teachers who volunteer for the Muslim Histories and Culture Project (MHCP) attend,” and not from the curriculum itself. He assures us that a “a 60-something-year-old world history teacher with a Master’s Degree” can “read books from various points of view and reach his own conclusions,” and that “the training involved no pro-Islam proselytizing.”

    It is odd that the teacher sessions would involve whitewashing of Islamic teaching and of its historical record, but that the curriculum itself would not, and Stein doesn’t explain how that happened. Nor does he explain why we should trust his 60-something-year-old world history teacher. And even if his world history teacher is extremely knowledgeable about Islam, the material presented at Atlas Shrugs did not involve proselytizing, which he assures us is not happening, but whitewashing, which he does not address. And while I would love to take his word for it, arguments from authority are the weakest of all arguments, and he ultimately presents nothing to assure anyone that the questionable material in the teacher sessions is not making its way into the classroom. After all, what are the teacher sessions for, if not to train the teachers on how to present the material in the classroom?

    He also says that there was nothing in the seminar abstracts “that even remotely qualifies as pro-Sharia.” Yet the material we do see presents Muhammad as a benign moral teacher, saying nothing about his teachings of hatred, warfare and subjugation, and also whitewashes the oppressive history of Muslim Spain, and other matters. To dismiss concern about this by saying it’s not “pro-Sharia” is too narrow. The heavily slanted and wholly positive view of Islam that Islamic supremacist groups have insinuated into textbooks and curricula fosters ignorance of the nature of the jihad threat and complacency about it, and provides a basis for proselytization from other materials. Ignore or minimize this at your own risk.

    2. The Aga Khan and the Ismailis.

    Stein says that “if Robert Spencer – whose entire raison d’être is investigating and tracking Islamists – didn’t know about these ‘new facts’ until last week, well…certainly Rick Perry can be excused for not knowing them as well.” No, he can’t. I am not entering into partnership with the Aga Khan. If I were, I would certainly vet him thoroughly first, and Perry should have. As far as not knowing about these issues, I wish I could keep up with all the violent and stealthy jihad activity going on in the world, but there is just too much of it, and the purchase of a tainted bank and investment in a tainted regime by the Aga Khan is simply not something that is going to become an issue until someone like Rick Perry becomes a viable presidential candidate, and everyone starts rushing to declare him the perfect candidate without properly vetting him. Perry should have vetted the Aga Khan, and we must vet Rick Perry.

    3. The Habib Bank.

    Stein points out that “the Aga Khan Foundation was not part-owner of Habib Bank until two years after the murder of Daniel Pearl,” and dismisses all concern about it accordingly, even though the bank is in Pakistan, a country Stein himself terms “about as loyal and trustworthy an ally as a pet scorpion.” Does Stein have information to the effect that the Aga Khan dismissed everyone who had been with the bank before he bought it, and thoroughly cleansed it of all al-Qaeda ties? Would such a thing even be possible to do in Pakistan?

    4. The Aga Khan’s investments in Syria.

    Regarding the Aga Khan’s investments in Syria, Stein contends that “‘General Moustapha Sharba’ accusation is found only on the ‘everything but the kitchen sink’ conspiracy-theory site of Mark Mitchell.” Actually there is a picture of Sharba with Ismaili leaders on an Ismaili website. Why doesn’t Stein mention that?

    Then he dismisses the Aga Khan investments in Syria by pointing out that the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) did humanitarian work in countries ruled by tyrannical regimes, and challenges Pamela Geller to show that the Aga Khan money went to terrorist activity. However, the fact that one group does a foolish thing doesn’t excuse someone else for doing the same foolish thing. In any case, the JDC was not endorsing the Ceaucescu regime by giving that aid; however, the Aga Khan worked directly with the Assad regime. Aiding oppressed people in spite of their regime is not the same thing as working with that regime, thereby freeing it up to spend its own funds on terrorist or other nefarious activity. Syria is a state sponsor of terrorism. If that means anything at all, no one should be investing there.

    5. Norquist.

    Stein points out that Norquist is ubiquitous and powerful. Granted. But Perry and Norquist are very close. Perry has raised funds for Norquist. They have vacationed together. Until I see Bachmann, West, and the others Stein mentioned doing the same thing, I will continue to raise questions about Perry’s closeness to Norquist.

    • TruthWFree says:

      Perry needs to come clean with a statement on this association. Was he ignorant and what is his knowledge and understanding on Islam? We do not need another leader (like Obama) in Washington that turns a blind eye to subversive jihad. Actually, Obama is aiding subversive jihad in this country, not just turning a blind eye.

    • ertdfg says:

      So your point on “vetting” is that he should have known or assumed bad faith with no evidence… as we should with any Muslim I guess, even one you think is peaceful and moderate?

      Basically that any relationship of any type with any Muslim aside from unreasoning hatred should be a dealbreaker and the presumption should be made that all Muslims are evil, working in bad faith, and unworthy to have any sort of association with?

      Yep, have any dealings with any Muslim anywhere and you’re no longer fit for public office… because unreasoning hatred is good, and thinking, rational thought, and being able to discern a difference between people is bad. Only stereotyping, and bigotry should be used in place of thinking on this issue.

      Go ahead and hold that ground if you want. Enjoy it really, I have to say a wild-eyed violent radical hating all on the other side, all that associate with “the enemy” and all further associations even to friends of friends of acquaintances of someone they once met looks like fun… it looks bug-eyed crazy, but still fun.

      • Norwegian says:

        Up round here we have a new saying, “All gone to Breivik land”. Robert Spencer and Pamela Geller have been there for years. They somehow seem to think that all the muslims fighting and dying besides US and NATO personel in our conflicts are not existing, or if they do exist are not worth treating like humans because of their faith. Pure, old fashioned hatemongering.

  7. Foster says:

    Just to remind you that the relation between Perry and Aga Khan are not RECENTS. The following statements was release by Iamaili Mail, so Perry is naive since a long time. What God knows what they have been talking about before and after the meeting in Austin.
    Foster

    His Highness the Aga Khan and Governor Rick Perry sign an agreement between the Ismaili Imamat and the State of Texas

    October 31, 2009 by ismailimail 4 Comments

    Austin, Texas, 30 October 2009 — Governor Rick Perry of Texas and His Highness the Aga Khan, 49th hereditary Imam (spiritual leader) of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims, today signed a historic agreement to expand collaboration in the areas of education, health sciences, natural disaster preparedness and recovery, culture and the environment.

    “Working together we can address poverty, disaster preparedness and response, the spread of disease, and access to education,” said Governor Perry. He made the remarks during a signing ceremony at the State Capitol, attended by representatives of the Government of Texas, the University of Texas and Texas A&M University.

    “I think our experience has been that it is civil society which is the greatest underwriter of development in the developing world. The political constructs are essential but civil society has demonstrated itself to be able to continue to sustain development of poor people in complex situations in Asia and in Africa,” said the Aga Khan, who is the founder and Chairman of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) — a global system of development agencies.

    More … http://www.akdn.org/Content/863
    Photo gallery … http://www.akdn.org/slideshow.asp?Sid=155

  8. harry martin says:

    Hello, Sir,

    Pamela Geller is RIGHT! Do more research!

    • ertdfg says:

      All your sourcing, evidence, data, and proof has persuaded me… oh you didn’t have a single shred of any of that?

      Why not? Is actually proving your point (with verifiable data, as was done above) too complicated for you?

      Claiming something with no reasoning, no justification, no proof, no evidence, and no apparent thought isn’t persuasive… it’s just disappointing.

      Now not only do I disagree with you, I feel sorry for you… the world is hard to deal with when you’re stupid. I hope you don’t suffer too much from your misfortune.

  9. t-partay joe says:

    Pamela Geller is a complete idiot, apparently.

  10. z says:

    Gullah maybe this will give you a better understanding on how Ismailis differ from other Muslims. I feel like I would be a credible source as I am a Texan born Ismaili. Ismaili’s belive that the Aga Khan is a living talking Quran. Yes, we do belive the Quran as a holy book but alot of things in there are out dated. Such as the talk of killing the infiedels. At the time there were wars going on similar to the Holy Crusades for Christians. Killing the infidels is not relevent now because we live in a diffrent time in where people learn to love, respect, and appreciate diffrent races, cultures and religions. Ismaili’s are modern muslims that adapt with the time, thats why we always have a present living Imam. The Ismaili Imam interpruts the Quran in the present living time that we live in. For instance in the Quran it allows men to have multiple wives. No Ismaili’s that I know have multiple wives. And I know alot of Ismailis. My parents are both Ismaili’s who were born in Pakistan and my Dad treats my Mom as an equal. Ismaili’s are taught to love one another and to preach tolerance. We are taught that even though some people might not understand us we should try to explain to them the truth and if they still don’t belive us than its fine and that we should not be angry. If you have any questions I can try to answer them to the best of my ability. If you don’t belive anything I said and still hate Muslims and Ismailis thats fine too. I just appreciate you taking your time to read what I had to say. Hopefully somebody will belive me and mabey they will tell someone else and so forth and hopefully people will learn to trust Ismailis and other Muslims. I know I have a lot of misspelling. Please forgive me I wanted to submit this fast too see if you respond.

    • Ertdfg...you're an idiot says:

      Z… how can you believe that the “word of god” is outdated and no longer applies, especially when there are “prophetic” verses which claim that Islam will wipe the Jews and infidels off the face of the earth until no one remains but muslims? How can you pick and choose which of “gods” words you believe and which ones you don’t believe? As far as I know there has been no abrogation of Allahs command to “strike the necks” of the infidels until they submit to Islam, or pay the jizzya tax and feel themselves to be humiliated. It sounds to me as if you don’t believe that the Qu’ran is really the word of “god” at all, but only some words which you can pick and choose which ones you want to believe.

    • TruthWFree says:

      Z Says,
      Z, I am a Christian. I believe and try to follow every word that was written about what Jesus Christ said and taught in the Gospels. I fall short on some. I understand from my readings (including the Quran in its entirety), that Muslims are to believe it is the word of Allah. I also understand that it is as applicable now as it was in Muhammad’s day. Jesus Christ’s teachings in the Gospels are for all times, not just in those times when he walked the earth.
      You are saying “not so” on the Quran. How do you determine which parts are for all times and which parts are for the 7th century? Are you practicing taqiyya on us? The Muslims that kill infidels do not believe as you say. They believe as I say.
      Your Quran says that Jesus Christ was not the son of Allah and that he did not die on the cross. Is this for those times or for all times? As a Christian, I believe these statements in the Quran are lies. Taqiyya is lying to further Islam. Jesus Christ, in the Gospels said “Satan is the father of lies”. Allah is …you know who I think he is.
      I invite you to come to the Light of Jesus Christ if you are sincere. He said He was one with the Father and you have seen Me, you have seen the Father, and no one comes to the Father except through Me. The God of Christians (and Jews) is a loving God, rich in compassion. Allah is a god of hate. The Quran is full of hate. Allah is not the same person as the God of Abraham and the Father of Jesus. The teachings are diametrically opposed. I invite you to read the Gospels and get to know Jesus Christ. Jesus commanded us Christians to preach the Gospel to all nations. Come to the love that is Jesus Christ.

  11. Rich says:

    The Norquist complaint might be the best I’ve ever seen. Nearly every single R on Capitol Hill has signed hsi pledges and knows the man personally. Does that make them all jihadis now? Apparently it does, according to Pam.

  12. Zane says:

    Geller and Spencer are not waging jihad on another blogger. He linked to this blog and now they are in full blown attack mode.

    What do they think they are gaining by going to war with other bloggers who doesn’t buy into their spin? Perhaps Geller should not be pandering for Palin when she links a Salon article and quotes CAIR (who never met an infidel they didn’t hate).

  13. Zane says:

    Sorry, I meant to say “Geller and Spencer are NOW waging jihad against another blogger.”

    • Ertdfg...you're an idiot says:

      Spencer and Geller are doing what any self respecting person would do, especially when they know they are correct, they are defending their positions against someone who attacked them first. And apparently it has been relatively easy to do since David Stein doesn’t know what the hell he is talking about. Good day.

  14. Bob McEwen says:

    The one point that everyone that is defending Islam seems to miss is the command in the Quran that Muslims are instructed to lie to Infidels. Wake up people. The problem is that we Americans (infidels) are so naive, uninformed and ignorant when it comes to Islam that we will believe their lies about being a peaceful religion (which it is not a religion but a cult) and go along our happy little merry way. Allah is figment of the imagination of a dope-smoking, pedophile (Mohammad) that was in the desert and the sun too long.
    Muslims will lie to you straight-faced because they are commanded to do so to promote Islam and their goal is simple–take over the world.
    WAKE UP DUMMIES!

    • MisterM says:

      Bob,

      I get it – I TOTALLY understand where you’re coming from, especially with the media the way it is these days and with so many half truths and so much misinformation out there. I get your anger, I get your fear.

      Im an Ismaili Muslim, a follower of the Aga Khan. If you’re set in your ways, you’re set in your ways but I’d just like to let you know that in this case, you’re wrong. I can’t speak for other Muslim sects, only of my own, cause Im part of it.

      My parents lived in Africa and were thrown out by Idi Amin. There was no grand plan to come here and dominate or whatever. Circumstance led them here and as a result, I was born here. I consider myself an American above all else. This country gave GREAT opportunity to me and my family. My dad, in the 70′s, came here with a few bucks in his pocket and started flipping burgers. Through hard work he became the President of one of the biggest companies on the East Coast. We live well and I OWE THIS COUNTRY EVERYTHING.

      Some crazy idiots did the most horrible things under the guise of ISLAM. They couldn’t have been further from the meaning of the religion if it fell on their face. They were the SCUM of the earth and deserve eternal damnation. Even though I am Muslim, to protect our country I SUPPORT FULLY pulling out the Muslims in line at an airport, MYSELF INCLUDED, because guess what – it was Muslims who did those horrible acts. Its only common sense that Muslims should be screened extensively by security. No Left Wing PC stuff here, facts and facts and I support them, especially if they save the life of even ONE INNOCENT PERSON.

      But you’re so far off base about us and the Aga Khan. He teaches tolerance, peace, RESPECT AND GRATITUDE for the countries that took us in. I volunteer at an old age home and hospital, which is mostly filled with Christians.

      I have never read the Quran. I guess I should at some point, but as Ismailis we listen to the word of the Aga Khan and we don’t follow the literal interpretations of the Quran, so its not that important to us. I have NEVER heard of this “lying” to deceive thing. Thats seriously crazy, lol. Its totally laughable. But hell, I won’t convince you if you’re already convinced.

      There are a lot of crazies out there, but we’re not part of that. Unfortunately, we’re the minority.

      Also, I think its disrespectful to say the things you said about Prophet Mohammed. Sure, if you feel a certain way you’re entitled to it, but I would never say such derogatory things about an entity that certain populations feel so highly about. Thats disrespectful, in my humble opinion. You’re arguments would go much further without inflammatory slander, I think.

      I wish you well and hope that you will do your own investigating. Education is what will get everyone out of the mess we’re currently in. Education and understanding.

      I was born here. Im American and Im Muslim. Im proud to be both and ashamed at how some of my own have truly perverted a peaceful religion.

      Be well.

      • Alyssa A Lappen says:

        Thank you for your respectful explanation of Ismali teachings, giving a brief recount of your family history and expressing your love for America.

        (I was especially interested in your parents’ origin in Uganda, and their history under Idi Amin.

        So few people realize he was a Saudi-educated Islamic radical and murderer.)

        I’m happy that your family contributed to and benefited from America. That’s what makes this country great, among other things.

        Thanks again for sharing. I very much appreciate it. May God bless you and keep you.

        • MisterM says:

          Thanks for your very kind words Alyssa. As long as we can talk about these things within a context of respect and civility, future generations might not have the problems that we do.

          Again, I really appreciate your words. All the best to you and your family.

          Be well.

          • Ertdfg...you're an idiot says:

            MisterM… how can you assure Bob that what he says is incorrect concerning what the Qu’ran says if you have never read the Qu’ran? I assure you, as one who has read much of the Qu’ran and the Hadiths that what Bob said is the truth. And if you are trusting in one person, namely the Aga Khan, to tell you what your religion is and what you should think and believe, then that is a textbook example of what a cult is.

  15. MisterM says:

    I didn’t say Bob was wrong about what the Quran says or doesn’t say; I said Bob was wrong about his interpretation of MY sect of Islam, the Ismailis.

    Sure, I concede that blind faith is probably textbook behaviour of a cult follower. That being said, I have had my own experiences that tell me otherwise. Besides, Ismaili-ism is more to do with being a kind and considerate person, who focuses on charitable endeavours and education. Ismailism is pretty light on Dogma. Does one need religion to teach them the virtues of kindness, charity and caring for the community as a whole? Absolutely not. At the end of the day you’re entitled to your opinions, as am I. Im sorry if I don’t have a more concise answer for you. I really don’t want to get into personal experiences and such. Regardless, be well.

    • TruthWFree says:

      MistereM, I suggest you get a copy of the Quran and read it. Then I suggest you get a Bible and read the Gospels, Matthew, mark, Luke, and John.
      You will find many violent verses in the Quran against non believers, 2-193, 9-5, 9-29, and 5-51 are a good start. You will find nothing like that in the Gospels except Jesus’ teaching of love and forgiveness and his many witnessed miracles. By the way, Muhammad had no witnessed miracles, none. If you are sincere above, you are not a Muslim. Muslims are required to engage in and support Jihad (the violent kind). Your post sounds like you’d make a good Christian. Islamic teachings in the Quran and the Hadiths are not peaceful. The Islamic terrorists are following the Quran and Hadiths perfectly. That’s a FACT.

  16. Chris says:

    It’s a shame that some posters here, such as TruthWFree, have such a limited experience of the world that they cannot comprehend very basic religious differences. The idea that “The Koran says this, so all Muslims MUST believe it!” is laughable. Not only does it show that these posters have no understanding of comparative religion, they also reveal a deep ignorance of their own religious texts. Of course the Bible has its share of violent passages. Most Christians do not follow these passages. Everybody picks and chooses, even the most devout Christian.

    Unfortunately violence is a much bigger problem in the Muslim world, precisely because they have tended to stick to a fundamentalist interpretation of the Koran and have avoided attempts at reform and breaks from tradition. The Ismailis should be encouraged in their efforts to overturn this trend.

    Some here have accused them of taqqiya, but why would they lie about being modernist reformers when they are persecuted for doing so? That makes absolutely zero sense.

    The fact is that all religions go through different permutations through time. Islam has been stuck in the past for too long. Thankfully, there are many Muslims out there trying to change this. Encouraging them to convert to another religion entirely isn’t going to help matters. You may think you are saving their soul, but as a Christian I do not believe that God would make someone spend an eternity in hell simply for not believing every word of a book compiled 2,000 years ago…that would be crazy and immoral. I am not a Biblical literalist, just as MisterM is not a literalist of the Koran. I am amazed at people who have such a hard time understanding people like us…but like I said, their experience of the world must be extraordinarily limited. They have been raised in environments which do not encourage critical thinking, only blind obedience. This is exactly the kind of thinking that leads to the radicalism and terrorism that we see today.

  17. MisterM says:

    Well said Chris! Thanks so much for your understanding and rational thinking (which is seemingly in short supply these days!). Being able to have a civil dialogue about these issues, as well as acknowledging our common bonds will allow us to be the great country that we truly are. Free of vitriol and anger, free of fear of those different from ourselves. Your comment is spot on. All the best to you and your family. Cheers.

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